Veterans For Peace Chapter 93, located in south central Michigan, is named in honor of two legendary peace activists, Utah Phillips and J. David Singer. Veterans For Peace Seeks to increasing public awareness of the costs of war, restrain our government from intervening in the affairs of other nations, reduce the arms race as well as eliminating nuclear weapons, and to abolish war as an instrument of international policy.

Current Chapter News & Events

Ukraine Crisis

For updates from Veterans For Peace on events in the Ukraine, please visit the national VFP at www.veteransforpeace.org or on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/veteransforpeace. Also, to be placed on the national VFP bi-weekly email news update visit https://veteransforpeace.salsalabs.org/eblast0/index.html. Local actions on the crisis will be posted at the Chapter’s Facebook (www.facebook.com/VFP93), web page (www.vfp93.org) and Chapter email/newsletter list (sign up to be placed on the list at https://www.vfp93.org/newsletter-sign-up).

Next Veterans For Peace Chapter 93 Meeting – Tuesday, May 17, 2022, 7:30pm

The next VFP Chapter 93 meeting will be held online only, Tuesday, May 17th at 7:30pm. If you would like to participate in the meeting online and your computer has a microphone and video, go to the Zoom meeting link of

https://zoom.us/j/95022299743  No computer access? Dial  312-626-6799 and enter the Meeting ID of  950 2229 9743  if prompted,.

Anyone can participate in this meeting, or any other VFP Chapter 93 event, be they veteran or not. For a meeting agenda, it is the first item in the Chapter’s May newsletter (see below).

​​Current Chapter Newsletter

The May 2022 VFP Chapter 93 Newsletter is available in both a downloadable PDF format and Word/Open Office format. 

VFP Arlington Michigan Display In Downtown Detroit On Memorial Day – May 30th

Veterans For Peace Chapters 74 and 93 have again joined forces to set up the Veterans For Peace Arlington Michigan display (one grave marker for every Michigan soldier killed in the Afghan and Iraq wars – 230 total) in downtown Detroit on Memorial Day. The purpose of this display is to honor those who have fallen, to provide a place to grieve, and to educate the public about the costs of war, as well as the needs of those returning from conflicts. The display will be held on Monday, May 30th, 11am to 5pm, in downtown Detroit’s Grand Circus Park (Woodward at East Adams – map link at https://goo.gl/maps/MjhWcB4ospmmwwFu6).

The Radical Origin Of Mother’s Day

By Laura Kacere - CodePink

There’s a good number of us who question holidays like Mother’s Day in which you spend more time feeding money into a system that exploits our love for our mothers than actually celebrating them.  It’s not unlike any other holiday in America in that its complete commercialization has stripped away so much of its genuine meaning, as well its history.  Mother’s Day is unique in its completely radical and totally feminist history, as much as it has been forgotten.

 

Mother’s Day began in America in 1870 when Julia Ward Howe wrote the Mother’s Day Proclamation. Written in response to the American Civil War and the Franco-Prussian War, her proclamation called on women to use their position as mothers to influence society in fighting for an end to all wars. She called for women to stand up against the unjust violence of war through their roles as wife and mother, to protest the futility of their sons killing other mothers’ sons.

 

Howe wrote: “Arise, then, women of this day! Arise, all women who have hearts, Whether our baptism be of water or of tears! Say firmly: "We will not have great questions decided by irrelevant agencies, Our husbands will not come to us, reeking with carnage, for caresses and applause. Our sons shall not be taken from us to unlearn All that we have been able to teach them of charity, mercy and patience. We, the women of one country, will be too tender of those of another country To allow our sons to be trained to injure theirs."

 

The holiday caught on years later when a West Virginia women’s group led by Anna Reeves Jarvis began promoting it as a way to reunite families after the Civil War.  After Jarvis’ death, her daughter began a campaign for the creation of an official Mother’s Day in honor of peace. Devoting much of her life to the cause, it wasn’t until 1914 when Woodrow Wilson signed it into national observance in 1914.

 

The holiday flourished, along with the flower industry. The business journal, the Florists Review, actually admitted to its desire to exploit the holiday. Jarvis was strongly opposed to every aspect of the holiday’s commercialization, arrested for protesting the sale of flowers, and petitioning to stop the creation of a Mother’s Day postage stamp.

 

Today we are in multiple wars that continue to claim the lives of thousands of sons and daughters.  We are also experiencing a still-rising commercialization of nearly every aspect of life; the exploitation of every possible human event and emotion at the benefit of corporations.

 

Let’s take this Mother’s Day to excuse ourselves from the pressure to consume and remember its radical roots – that mothers, or rather all women, in fact, all people, have a stake in war and a responsibility as American citizens to protest the incredible violence that so many fellow citizens, here and abroad, must suffer through.

Apply For A Peace Scholarship Application

Scholarship applications for the Chapter's Peace Scholarship Program can be obtained by clicking here.

Ideas For Non-Violent Action

In these difficult times, these 198 methods of nonviolent action have all been used in historical instances of nonviolent struggle - http://www.mapm.org/documents/198_nonviolent_methods_2007.pdf

 

If you are a veteran, or know of a veteran that needs help...

 

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